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Hacker Releases Obscene Images To Seesaw Users in USA

Parents in the USA reported the obscene campaign where the unknown Threat Actor was circulating adult images through educational app Seesaw.

Hacker Releases Obscene Images To Seesaw Users in USA
  • PublishedSeptember 20, 2022

Parents and students of an educational app in the USA have been reportedly getting notoriously obscene images in their chatrooms. As per reports, a hacker targeted the school app with over ten million users that included students, faculty members, and teachers. 

According to a BBC report, the images were sent from a compromised account of a Seesaw app user. The pictures were of an explicit internet meme distributed among parents, teachers, faculty members, and students using the app. Seesaw is one of the most popular educational apps that enables collaboration between teachers, parents, and students.

Parents in the USA reported the obscene campaign where the unknown Threat Actor (TA) was circulating adult images through the app. Upon receiving the explicit images, one of the users informed Seesaw via a Twitter post. “You have a hack in messages that allow an inappropriate picture to be shared with families and teachers across multiple districts. Please take action,” read the tweet.

Seesaw responded to the ongoing campaign 

Seesaw responded to the ongoing campaign and stated that the hackers could have gained access to administrative privileges and hacked into “isolated” individual accounts.

The company also shared details about the attack and responded on a status page, reports BBC. According to the post, the alleged hacker used widely available emails and passwords to access Seesaw accounts and distributed the obscene images to students, teachers, and parents who were part of the groups. 

Parents rushed to media outlets in the USA and shared the incident of the obscene images that appeared in the group chats. Amid all the confusion, the head of a school in Milwaukee urged parents not to blame individuals whose accounts were used to send the images.

Even though it appears that the “specific names of parents” were attached to messages shared by the hackers, the school’s statements stated that the parents were not involved in these campaigns.

Written By
Ashish Khaitan

Ashish is a technical writer at The Cyber Express. He adores writing about the latest technologies and covering the latest cybersecurity events. In his free time, he likes to play horror and open-world video games.

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